Bridget Andersen

Bridget Andersen

Marketing Automation Specialist
LinkedIn Profile
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Bridget Andersen is a Marketing Automation Specialist at nib health funds, where she’s responsible for developing automated digital marketing campaigns. She started her career in public relations, then made the move to Melbourne and enjoyed a stint in recruitment before moving back to Newcastle. She’s since specialised in digital marketing and is passionate about designing meaningful digital experiences for customers.

Bridget has a Bachelor of Communication and is studying her MBA at University of Newcastle as a Women in MBA (WiMBA) Scholar. She was the 2019 recipient of the HunterNet Future Leaders Program scholarship and has been appointed to the UON Academic Senate for 2020.

How do you manage your work/life balance?

I’m fortunate that where I work has a great focus on work/life balance, and allows for flexible hours and work from home days when needed. I try not to take my work home with me, and I also try to focus on having small things to look forward to throughout the workweek – like dinner with friends, movie night or self-care dates. That helps break the cycle of feeling like all you do is work and then overcommitting on weekends. Above all, looking after my mental health has been essential to me- giving myself permission to decompress after being on the go allows me to re-charge and reset.

Where do you see your industry heading and how have you positioned yourself to benefit from these changes?

Automation and digital marketing as a whole will replace traditional marketing in the future, and that’s something I’ve been seeing in the few years I’ve worked in the industry. I started in traditional marketing but quickly had to develop my digital skillset to adapt. I’ve learned to code (which I never knew how much I would love) and recently I’ve gained a much deeper understanding of how we can use data to improve customer experiences. Automation is a major industry buzzword at the moment, so I’m lucky to be at the forefront of this space.

What characteristics do you think an individual needs to be successful in your profession (or in general)?

The biggest thing in my world is the ability to think outside of the box and take educated risks. We’re always testing out new ideas- sometimes they work, sometimes they don’t- but the important thing is to learn from it each time. Something I’ve learned over the past few years is to not take work too seriously- a career is important, but so is enjoying yourself and if you’re going to spend 40 hours a week somewhere, you may as well have fun!

How do you define success?

I recently read a quote from Michelle Obama which said “success isn’t about how your life looks to others. It’s about how it feels to you.”  I count success by feeling content in all areas of my life- relationships, work, family and self. Though I do set ambitious goals for myself, I try to be patient and take things step by step, knowing I’m on the right path. I write a bucket list each year of experiences I want to have and things I want to achieve, and ticking them off is the best feeling ever.

What advice would you give to someone five years younger than you, in any industry, to help them achieve success?

I’d give the same advice given to me by my manager and mentor, which was to visualise the highest level you want to achieve in your career, then map out each role you’ll need in between where you are now and your goal (plus any career development that will help you). After I’d pictured what goal I wanted to achieve I knew that I needed to focus on gaining business skills and leadership experience, which is what I’m working towards now. Having a plan and milestones along the way gives you direction, but is also really motivating and encouraging for each small goal you achieve. But it’s important to be open to the fact that your goals might change, and that’s OK. Your career should always support and enrich your life no matter what stage you’re in.